Category Archives: Self-Knowledge

Trust Your Own Judgment

Judg­ment means draw­ing con­clu­sions, mak­ing deci­sions for your­self and act­ing on your best instincts.  Like a lot of lead­er­ship top­ics, it’s about too much or too lit­tle.  Too much trust of self can lead to biased or mag­i­cal think­ing.  Too lit­tle, we’re sim­ply let­ting oth­ers decide.  Some­where in the mid­dle is a sweet spot.  That’s not news but it’s sometimes […]

The Master Blows It Out

Lead­ing is more or less drenched in the assump­tions of indi­vid­u­al­ism.  At least in Unit­ed States cul­ture, the tra­di­tion­al belief is that lead­ing oth­ers depends on hav­ing a strong, clear sense of self, one that is more or less unas­sail­able by cir­cum­stances or the arbi­trary per­cep­tions of oth­ers. Even when there is an awareness — […]

The Reason for Evil

Gwen Adshead begins her recent book, The Dev­il You Know: Sto­ries of Human Cru­el­ty and Com­pas­sion, with an epi­graph from Carl Jung: “The rea­son for evil in the world is that peo­ple are not able to tell their sto­ries.” As a foren­sic psy­chol­o­gist and psy­chother­a­pist she’s heard some unimag­in­able ones — from decades of listening […]

On Organizational Anger

There is a form of orga­ni­za­tion­al anger that all lead­ers need to under­stand. It is not the hos­tile out­burst of an aggriev­ed staff mem­ber, though this may be a symp­tom just as a shoot­er in a pub­lic place can be a symp­tom of a broad­er social despair. It is not the same as deal­ing with […]